QUICK & ENDURING.

PRECISE & POWERFUL.

AGILE & STRONG.

Few competitors can claim all of these qualities to describe their skills.

The combination of physical versatility with determination, leadership, and intelligence, makes for an athletic powerhouse.

As a heptathlete, pentathlete, and high jumper for the University of Maryland, Peyton Wade has these champion talents and traits. The track and field junior enters this season ready to build on her past success with her sights set on new achievements.

Track and field, however, was not always Wade’s focus.

“I started track to train for soccer,” Wade said of her high school athletic career. “I didn’t even see myself running in college.”

Shortly after her second sport start, she traded soccer cleats for track spikes and never looked back.

An asset to the university’s track and field team, Wade specializes in the high jump. To similarly successful results, she also competes in the indoor pentathlon, a system of five different events, as well as the outdoor heptathlon, a two-day challenge of seven different events.

“I practice a lot, everyday, all week,” Wade said. “You have to be efficient at practice – quality over quantity.” With a variety of both track and field events to prepare for, productivity is key in Wade’s training program. Fortunately for the competitor, the rest of her talents are instinctive.

“My body movements come natural to high jumping,” Wade said. The two-time NCAA East Regional qualifier boasts a personal record of 5 feet 10 inches in the high jump.

As her best event, the high jump is the center of Wade’s ultimate goal to make it to the NCAA Track and Field Championships. Though this event receives much of Wade’s focus, other events are often a blur.

“I like to run, and each year I get better and better at it. High jump I can enjoy, and then give it my all in hurdles. I never remember the race,” Wade said.

Through the highs and lows of multiple events that vary in ease for Wade’s natural build and refined skill, she notes that mental strength is the key to advanced achievements on the track and in the field.

“Some days you’ll have good days or bad days in certain events, but you can’t let poor performance in one event affect the next,” Wade said. Personal dedication keeps her engaged, but teammates fuel her motivation.

“I see my friends on the team and want to work just as hard,” Wade said. “It’s not that I’m in competition with my teammates, my teammates in each event help push me.” Wade observes others, but those around her look up to her.

“She leads by example in terms of the dedication that it takes to be a D1 athlete,” said Andrew Valmon, head coach of the University of Maryland’s track and field team. “She’s driven, she wants to be good,” he said of Wade, whose aspirations aren’t limited to athletics.

The junior public health science major is pre-pharmacy with hopes to one day open her own pharmacy.

“If you work hard, everything works out in the end, wherever God’s path leads me,” Wade said.

With pharmaceutical goals ahead, the possibility of an Olympic appearance is a secondary focus of Wade’s.

Her talent and determination, however, make anything possible.

“Sky’s the limit,” Coach Valmon said of Wade’s potential.

Both athletically and professionally, Wade is ready to reach new heights.

Reaching New Heights is a special presentation of umterps.com.

 

Alyssa Haduck is a junior majoring in communications and romance languages at the University of Maryland and is a contributing writer to umterps.com.

 

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QUICK & ENDURING.

AGILE & STRONG.

PRECISE & POWERFUL.

Few competitors can claim all of these qualities to describe their skills.

The combination of physical versatility with determination, leadership, and intelligence, makes for an athletic powerhouse.

As a heptathlete, pentathlete, and high jumper for the University of Maryland, Peyton Wade has these champion talents and traits. The track and field junior enters this season ready to build on her past success with her sights set on new achievements.

Track and field, however, was not always Wade’s focus.

“I started track to train for soccer,” Wade said of her high school athletic career. “I didn’t even see myself running in college.”

Shortly after her second sport start, she traded soccer cleats for track spikes and never looked back.

An asset to the university’s track and field team, Wade specializes in the high jump. To similarly successful results, she also competes in the indoor pentathlon, a system of five different events, as well as the outdoor heptathlon, a two-day challenge of seven different events.

“I practice a lot, everyday, all week,” Wade said. “You have to be efficient at practice – quality over quantity.” With a variety of both track and field events to prepare for, productivity is key in Wade’s training program. Fortunately for the competitor, the rest of her talents are instinctive.

“My body movements come natural to high jumping,” Wade said. The two-time NCAA East Regional qualifier boasts a personal record of 5 feet 10 inches in the high jump.

As her best event, the high jump is the center of Wade’s ultimate goal to make it to the NCAA Track and Field Championships. Though this event receives much of Wade’s focus, other events are often a blur.

“I like to run, and each year I get better and better at it. High jump I can enjoy, and then give it my all in hurdles. I never remember the race,” Wade said.

Through the highs and lows of multiple events that vary in ease for Wade’s natural build and refined skill, she notes that mental strength is the key to advanced achievements on the track and in the field.

“Some days you’ll have good days or bad days in certain events, but you can’t let poor performance in one event affect the next,” Wade said. Personal dedication keeps her engaged, but teammates fuel her motivation.

“I see my friends on the team and want to work just as hard,” Wade said. “It’s not that I’m in competition with my teammates, my teammates in each event help push me.” Wade observes others, but those around her look up to her.

“She leads by example in terms of the dedication that it takes to be a D1 athlete,” said Andrew Valmon, head coach of the University of Maryland’s track and field team. “She’s driven, she wants to be good,” he said of Wade, whose aspirations aren’t limited to athletics.

The junior public health science major is pre-pharmacy with hopes to one day open her own pharmacy.

“If you work hard, everything works out in the end, wherever God’s path leads me,” Wade said.

With pharmaceutical goals ahead, the possibility of an Olympic appearance is a secondary focus of Wade’s.

Her talent and determination, however, make anything possible.

“Sky’s the limit,” Coach Valmon said of Wade’s potential.

Both athletically and professionally, Wade is ready to reach new heights.