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Maryland Posts Record-Breaking GSR Scores

Maryland Athletics
11-8-2017
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COLLEGE PARK, Md. – The University of Maryland has earned an institutional Graduation Success Rate (GSR) of 84 percent in figures released today by the National Collegiate Athletics Association. It marks the eighth time in the thirteen-year history of the metric that Maryland has been above 80 percent.

Maryland's Federal Graduation Rate (FGR) for student-athletes was reported at 66 percent, one percent lower than the overall NCAA Division I aggregate of 67 percent.

The Graduation Success Rate is a four-year measure of freshmen and transfer student-athletes who entered the University of Maryland between the fall of 2007 and the spring of 2011. It does not penalize the institution for those student-athletes who transfer from Maryland in good academic standing, as the FGR does. In addition, the GSR includes student-athletes who transfer into the institution and receive athletics aid, unlike the FGR.

The football program earned a GSR score of 79 percent, the highest in program history and higher than the NCAA FBS aggregate of 76 percent. Women’s basketball posted a GSR score of 100 percent for the first time on program history and higher than the NCAA aggregate of 89 percent.

“Our student-athletes continue to work hard in the classroom,” said Chris Uchacz, associate A.D. for academic services and career development. “They make us proud as they earn meaningful degrees that will serve them well in life after Maryland.”

In this most recent data, 11 teams at Maryland earned GSRs at or above 80 percent. Women’s basketball, field hockey, women’s golf, gymnastics, and volleyball had perfect 100 percent GSR scores. In addition, baseball, football, men’s lacrosse, women’s basketball, field hockey, women’s golf, gymnastics, women’s lacrosse, and volleyball all equaled or improved their GSR score from the previous year.

The GSR and FGR are separate from the NCAA's Academic Performance Rates (APR), which will be released in the spring 2018 semester.

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